Landscape Maintenance

Pest Alert: Grub Control

Pest Alert: Grub Control

Keeping your lawn healthy and clean is a hassle enough but year after year pests can make it even more difficult. If you've noticed  thinning grass and/or patches in your lawn chances are its time to check for grubs. The easiest way to check for grubs is to simply dig up some soil of about 2 inches deep and examine it.

Pest Alert: Japanese Beetles

Pest Alert: Japanese Beetles

Japanese beetles are always present in the Indiana landscape, but some years are definitely worse than others. This is one of those years. Are you stumped about how to keep the iridescent pests off of your plants? Today we'll talk about the pros and cons of different strategies.

Lawn Apps Decoded

Lawn Apps Decoded

At 317Grow, our standard lawn application regimen includes five applications spaced throughout the year. If you have a lawn care contract with us, this is probably old news to you, but have you ever wondered what goes into each application? This week on the blog we'll got into detail on each application and what it does for your lawn. For some more general information about our full range of lawn care services, check out last year's interview with Brian, our part owner and maintenance manager.

Cold Snaps and Spring Blooms

Cold Snaps and Spring Blooms

Our temperatures have been all over the place this winter, and we had especially warm weather just a few weeks ago. Most plants use temperature as an important cue in deciding when to break dormancy, so you have probably seen bulbs coming up much earlier than usual.

Fall Garden Cleanup: What to Cut Back When

Fall Garden Cleanup: What to Cut Back When

Now that we have had a few frosts and freezes, your landscape is probably mostly brown for the winter. Around this time of year I start go get a lot of questions about which plants should be cut back and which ones should be left. Fortunately for you, it's hard to go wrong on this. No plant will be hurt by not cutting it back, and most plants won't be bothered by being cut back. The decision-making mostly boils down to how much work you want to do now vs. in the spring, and what sort of look you like through the winter. To help you decide what goes and what stays, I'll break plants down into some helpful categories.

Share the Love: Dividing Perennials

Share the Love: Dividing Perennials

One of my favorite things about gardening is watching the landscape change and mature over the years. As plants start to fill in, they sometimes become overcrowded and need to be thinned or moved. Many perennials respond well to being divided, and then you can spread them to other areas of your yard, or share the joy with friends, family, and neighbors. Today we'll talk about what kinds of plants can be divided, and then we'll go over different methods for splitting and transplanting them.

Plant Disease Alert: Rose Rosette Disease

Plant Disease Alert: Rose Rosette Disease

Roses have always been a favorite garden plant, and with the introduction of easy-to-grow Knockout roses anyone can enjoy blooms all summer. But lately we've been seeing a spike in a disease that will ruin your roses: rose rosette disease. If you want to keep your roses, the disease must be caught early and cut out aggressively. So we want you to know the warning signs.

Cold Snaps and Spring Blooms

Cold Snaps and Spring Blooms

What a crazy winter we've had! With the exception of a few cold weeks, we've had an unseasonably warm winter. Most plants use temperature as an important cue in deciding when to break dormancy, so you have probably seen bulbs coming up much earlier than usual. But the risk of frost or a hard freeze is far from over. So what happens to your plants if we get a hard freeze or a frost in the next few months?

8 Tips for Winterizing Your Garden

8 Tips for Winterizing Your Garden

As the season draws to its close, it's important to wrap things up correctly in the garden to save yourself some headaches in the spring. Raking up leaves and cutting back perennials are the obvious tasks (Dreading doing it on your own? Call us to schedule a leaf removal or fall clean up!), but there's more to it than that. Today we'll go over 8 essential end-of-year tips to keep your garden healthy through the winter and leave it ready to go in the spring.

Is My Arborvitae Dying?

Is My Arborvitae Dying?

The quick answer? Probably not. If you have arborvitae (or other evergreens), you may notice a lot of browning on interior needles this time of year. The good news is that your arborvitae is not dying, it's just time for fall needle loss (most likely anyway - but more on that later). Most conifers drop some amount of old needles in the fall, so if there has been brown on your spruces and pines as well in the past month, they are probably also fine.