Fall Garden Cleanup: What to Cut Back When

Fall Garden Cleanup: What to Cut Back When

Now that we have had a few frosts and freezes, your landscape is probably mostly brown for the winter. Around this time of year I start go get a lot of questions about which plants should be cut back and which ones should be left. Fortunately for you, it's hard to go wrong on this. No plant will be hurt by not cutting it back, and most plants won't be bothered by being cut back. The decision-making mostly boils down to how much work you want to do now vs. in the spring, and what sort of look you like through the winter. To help you decide what goes and what stays, I'll break plants down into some helpful categories.

November: Ginkgo

November: Ginkgo

The Ginkgo tree is a unique and fascinating tree. The species has been around since the time of the dinosaurs, so it is truly a living fossil. Ginkgo trees keep their leaves longer than most, but at some point (usually in November) the entire tree will turn a rich golden yellow practically overnight, and all its leaves will drop within a day or two in a beautiful golden shower. It is valued as a street tree and for home yards because it is long-lived, tolerant of harsh conditions, and it has a beautiful form.

Share the Love: Dividing Perennials

Share the Love: Dividing Perennials

One of my favorite things about gardening is watching the landscape change and mature over the years. As plants start to fill in, they sometimes become overcrowded and need to be thinned or moved. Many perennials respond well to being divided, and then you can spread them to other areas of your yard, or share the joy with friends, family, and neighbors. Today we'll talk about what kinds of plants can be divided, and then we'll go over different methods for splitting and transplanting them.

Plant Disease Alert: Rose Rosette Disease

Plant Disease Alert: Rose Rosette Disease

Roses have always been a favorite garden plant, and with the introduction of easy-to-grow Knockout roses anyone can enjoy blooms all summer. But lately we've been seeing a spike in a disease that will ruin your roses: rose rosette disease. If you want to keep your roses, the disease must be caught early and cut out aggressively. So we want you to know the warning signs.

October: Beautyberry

October: Beautyberry

With a name like beautyberry, how can you resist wanting this shrub in your landscape? The purple berries are so bright they practically glow from late September into winter (if the birds don't gobble them up first), and they pair perfectly with the chartreuse foliage at this time of year.

September: Switchgrass

September: Switchgrass

Welcome to September! Schools are back in session, football is getting started, and a certain coffee chain will soon start selling a certain squash-themed coffee-based beverage. One of my favorite early signs of the approach of fall is the way perennial grasses start to gradually shift to their rich winter browns and golds. Switchgrass is a sturdy, stately perennial grass that looks its best in the late summer. It's low-maintenance, which is always a plus, and it's native to Indiana, which gets any plant extra points in my book.

Bringing the Resort Home

Bringing the Resort Home

Summer may be ending, but with a well-designed landscape you can feel like you're on vacation all year long. At this house, what started as a call to replace some plantings around the house became a total redesign showcasing the creativity of our staff. They re-imagined the space in a way that not only created a unique and more attractive landscape, but also improved the functionality and maximized the limited back yard space.

My Internship at 317Grow

My Internship at 317Grow

In the 3 months that I was here as an intern I gained and learned much more then I had in a year of college. From day one I knew 317Grow designed and constructed some of the most beautiful sites, but it was only after getting to know everyone here that I found out how they did it.

They work as a family, a family that helps and pushes each other to do the best that they can. They also work extremely hard and they don’t settle, they always aim to be the best.

Beyond Hostas: Shade Plants Galore!

Beyond Hostas: Shade Plants Galore!

Many of us have yards with shaded areas, but I get a lot of questions asking what the plant options are beyond hostas. Don't get me wrong, I love hostas - there are so many unique varieties, and bees and hummingbirds can't get enough of the flowers. But they are prone to slug and deer damage, and it's not crazy to want a little bit of something different. Below I've come up with 40 different plants for shade - some prefer dappled sunlight, and others can take pretty dense shade.

Wedding Blues: Container Design for a Perfect Day

Wedding Blues: Container Design for a Perfect Day

While we've prepared properties for weddings and other major celebrations a few times before, this week was the first time we created container designs to match a wedding's color scheme. The bride and groom picked pink and blue, and even though blue is one of the trickiest colors in the landscape, our staff came up with just the right plants for the occasion for both shade and sun containers.