Make Your Yard a Winter Wonderland

Make Your Yard a Winter Wonderland

Winter is upon us, and the world outside our windows has become a lot more grey and dreary. When we approach a new design, it is not at all unusual for the client to request that we include plants that will look interesting all year round. For most, their mind will automatically turn to evergreens, but there are so many more plants that can light up the winter landscape in other ways.

January: Coralberry and Snowberry

January: Coralberry and Snowberry

After the bright lights and colors of the holiday season it can be nice to settle down with a little subtle color left in the landscape after the lights come down. Close cousins coralberry and snowberry are great picks for low-key, hazy winter interest. It's definitely not a plant for a formal garden, but if you have more of a natural style or if you're looking to add a little something special to a wooded edge, this may be just the thing you need.

Guest Post: Caring for Poinsettias

Guest Post: Caring for Poinsettias

Poinsettias are a favorite around the holidays. While they are available in a variety of colors, they are most popular in their red variety. Their bright and cheery appearance can dress up any home for the holiday season as a festive centerpiece or addition to Christmas decor.  However, once the Christmas season has passed, it can be a challenge to get you poinsettia to rebloom. That is why FTD has put together a guide to the basics of poinsettia care and tips and tricks on how to get yours to bloom once the holiday season has passed. Enjoy! 

Plant Disease Alert: Boxwood Blight

Plant Disease Alert: Boxwood Blight

Just last week we highlighted boxwood as December's plant of the month, and there I alluded to a new disease that poses a major threat to boxwoods: boxwood blight. Today we'll go into more depth on why this fungal disease is so serious, how to spot it, and what to do if you think you've seen it.

December: Boxwood

December: Boxwood

Evergreen plants are the backbone of designs built to stun in all seasons. They provide the reliable structure to keep things from looking bare and help highlight the spots of color and texture that other plants like beautyberry and paperbark maple provide. We love to use boxwoods for this purpose. They do much better in our soils than a lot of other evergreens, and their ability to be sheared or grown naturally allow us to make all kinds of interesting artistic decisions with them.

Finding the Light, Together

Finding the Light, Together

This fall, a beautiful young woman said to me, "Miss Amanda, when did you know you wanted to own a company?" I looked at her for a short while, smiled and responded with, "NEVER!"

It’s the truth. Owning a company was never in my realm or thought process. I wanted to design. Change people’s lives. Push the limits in every possible way. Be weird. Make my family proud. Keep my parents guessing about what hair color would be next. And most importantly, teach my son the importance of following your passion, no matter what it may be. 

Fall Garden Cleanup: What to Cut Back When

Fall Garden Cleanup: What to Cut Back When

Now that we have had a few frosts and freezes, your landscape is probably mostly brown for the winter. Around this time of year I start go get a lot of questions about which plants should be cut back and which ones should be left. Fortunately for you, it's hard to go wrong on this. No plant will be hurt by not cutting it back, and most plants won't be bothered by being cut back. The decision-making mostly boils down to how much work you want to do now vs. in the spring, and what sort of look you like through the winter. To help you decide what goes and what stays, I'll break plants down into some helpful categories.

November: Ginkgo

November: Ginkgo

The Ginkgo tree is a unique and fascinating tree. The species has been around since the time of the dinosaurs, so it is truly a living fossil. Ginkgo trees keep their leaves longer than most, but at some point (usually in November) the entire tree will turn a rich golden yellow practically overnight, and all its leaves will drop within a day or two in a beautiful golden shower. It is valued as a street tree and for home yards because it is long-lived, tolerant of harsh conditions, and it has a beautiful form.

Share the Love: Dividing Perennials

Share the Love: Dividing Perennials

One of my favorite things about gardening is watching the landscape change and mature over the years. As plants start to fill in, they sometimes become overcrowded and need to be thinned or moved. Many perennials respond well to being divided, and then you can spread them to other areas of your yard, or share the joy with friends, family, and neighbors. Today we'll talk about what kinds of plants can be divided, and then we'll go over different methods for splitting and transplanting them.